á The Truth About Celia ☆ Download by Ë Kevin Brockmeier

á The Truth About Celia ☆ Download by Ë Kevin Brockmeier Very disconcerting story.
In a word lovely.
In another heartbreaking.
A series of short stories, written by a man not the author this is the frame narrative wondering what has become of his daughter, who disappeared when she was seven years old Some of the stories are realistic, imagining what happened that day or how the townspeople reacted or the adult Celia might have grown up to be.
It s how a father struggles to hold on while a mother struggles to move past It s different ways to deal with grief It s the In a word lovely.
In another heartbreaking.
A series of short stories, written by a man not the author this is the frame narrative wondering what has become of his daughter, who disappeared when she was seven years old Some of the stories are realistic, imagining what happened that day or how the townspeople reacted or the adult Celia might have grown up to be.
It s how a father struggles to hold on while a mother struggles to move past It s different ways to deal with grief It s the hopeful thoughts and dreams, no matter how realistic And it s all wonderful Gosh, what the hell is wrong with Keven Brockmeier One minute he s writing classic short stories like The Ceiling , the next minute he s writing stuff like this I mean, this isn t a bad book, by any measure But do we really needdisappeared child, sad parent novels And the way the story is handled, with a mix of magical realism and extreme emotion, makes it difficult to really connect with the characters Still, Brockmeier is a talented writer, and nothing he writes is without some Gosh, what the hell is wrong with Keven Brockmeier One minute he s writing classic short stories like The Ceiling , the next minute he s writing stuff like this I mean, this isn t a bad book, by any measure But do we really needdisappeared child, sad parent novels And the way the story is handled, with a mix of magical realism and extreme emotion, makes it difficult to really connect with the characters Still, Brockmeier is a talented writer, and nothing he writes is without some kind promise But if you re interested in the aftermath of children s deaths on parents and communities, I d recommend The Sweet Hereafter before I d recommend this Mawkish, disjointed story about a missing child thats held together by an unnecessary metatextual framing device, that of an imaginary author who is the missing childs father I appreciated the first 76 pages, particularly The Green Children, which was reprinted in Years Best Fantasy and Horror The rest of the book didnt work for me, especially not the chapter from the perspective of the missing presumably dead child A certain plot twist about a ghost child seemed clever, but with Mawkish, disjointed story about a missing child that s held together by an unnecessary metatextual framing device, that of an imaginary author who is the missing child s father I appreciated the first 76 pages, particularly The Green Children, which was reprinted in Year s Best Fantasy and Horror The rest of the book didn t work for me, especially not the chapter from the perspective of the missing presumably dead child A certain plot twist about a ghost child seemed clever, but with reflection, I decided it was merely gimmicky A fast but disappointing read Basically this is a story about a 7 year old girl who goes missing Some chapters are from the perspective of each of the parents, some are from the POV of the ghost girl, and other chapters are stories of maybe people tangentially related, or perhaps unrelated to the rest of the narrative It s about grief of course, and sometimes in a fantastical form.


Brilliant, like watching a brilliant chess match, not knowing why the rook moved there but in 5 moves it becomes apparent Not obtuse but stimulating Short but not a quick read for me, I was so impressed by the fragmentation of the narrative, and the subjective essence Brockmeier lends to his characters is at once thrilling For Brockmeier, the danger of falling into a predictable missing person trap was parried not by means of the story itself, but rather its presentation.
Kevin Brockmeier s writing makes me so happy that I am a reader His words just sing to me and hit all the most beautiful notes Even when he s describing the saddest thing in the world, the words sing.
I was expecting to like this better than I did, having lost a close family member it s a subject that is close to home It just didn t click at all The section switching characters seemed to serve no purpose, it felt completely flat I d have cut it some slack if the language was particularly good, but the verb constructions were all very weak, it felt very flat and lifeless, which is suppose is a reflection of the grief, but I think a better writer would have found a better way of expressing I was expecting to like this better than I did, having lost a close family member it s a subject that is close to home It just didn t click at all The section switching characters seemed to serve no purpose, it felt completely flat I d have cut it some slack if the language was particularly good, but the verb constructions were all very weak, it felt very flat and lifeless, which is suppose is a reflection of the grief, but I think a better writer would have found a better way of expressing that I m going to go with haunting This book is troubling and deliberate as it draws the reader into the nightmare created when a child disappears.
This is the story of a seven year old girl who is suddenly gone, leaving her father with grief, guilt and a touch of madness The book is presented from the perspective of the father, an author, as he imagines his Celia and the circumstances which may have surrounded her disappearance He considers that she may be growing up in a different I m going to go with haunting This book is troubling and deliberate as it draws the reader into the nightmare created when a child disappears.
This is the story of a seven year old girl who is suddenly gone, leaving her father with grief, guilt and a touch of madness The book is presented from the perspective of the father, an author, as he imagines his Celia and the circumstances which may have surrounded her disappearance He considers that she may be growing up in a different circumstance than the life that he and his wife had created He folds in on himself, unable to return to a functional life and losing his marriage to the incident.
Kevin Brockmeier is one of the most imaginative contemporary writers whom I have encountered His characters are real and appealing, but he introduces aspects of fantasy as he fabricates his story He thinks like no other author whom I have found.
I also recommend his The Brief History of the Dead While Playing Alone In Her Backyard One Afternoon, Seven Year Old Celia Suddenly Disappears While Her Father Christopher Is Inside Giving A Tour Of Their Historic House And Her Mother Janet Is At An Orchestra RehearsalUtterly Shattered, Christopher, A Writer Of Fantasy And Science Fiction, Withdraws From Everyone Around Him, Especially His Wife, Losing Himself In His Writing By Conjuring Up Worlds Where Celia Still Exists As A Child, As A Teenager, As A Young Single Mother And Revealing In His Stories Not Only His Own Point Of View But Also Those Of Janet, The Policeman In Charge Of The Case, And The Townspeople Affected By The Tragedy, Ultimately Culminating In A Portrait Of A Small Town Changed ForeverThe Truth About Celia Is A Profound Meditation On Grief And Loss And How We Carry On In Its Aftermath