[ Read Online Sound of the Beast: The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal ß democratic-republic-of-the-congo PDF ] by Ian Christe ↠´ bricksnboho.co.uk

[ Read Online Sound of the Beast: The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal ß democratic-republic-of-the-congo PDF ] by Ian Christe ↠´ do you like heavy metal good for you do you love it then read this book it breaks down every aspect and genre of metal in fascinating and fact backed detail there are charts my only criticism with this book is that it starts the history of heavy metal right at the birth of black sabbath and while i agree that sabbath is the great grandaddy of all us bangers and rightly deserve our worship i gotta point out that the zep and deep purple had a hand in it, too and way waaaay waaaaaaaaaaaay before them was robert johnson, a blues musician from the early 20th c who was rud to have sold his soul to the devil and whose haunting blues tracks, such as me and the devil blues, were re issued in the 60s inspiring blues rockers of the time like the zep, who took their seed from black american music before doing their own white british genetic modification.
is there ever a perfect history book, though i doubt it this goes great hand in hand with lords of chaos and bang your head The Sound of the Beast will seriously school you on the world of metal Offering a very clear progression of metal as we know it from Black Sabbath to Dillinger Escape Plan, this book reads like a long version of the type of magazine article that makes you stay seated in the bathroom until you finish, reading The writing is entertaining without degenerating into mind numbing aural description and Christe rarely uses the same hyphenated adjective twice Taken as an exhaustive overview of all things metal, or a trip down memory lane, this book is a winner Two devil horns way up m A great read for anyone with a passion for the music or who s chewed through the numerous rock star autobiographies on the market Motley Crue s The Dirt, for example, is a compelling story about one band s experience of what it was to ride the wave of metal stardom in the 1980s While both books are focused on heavy metal, Ian Christie s functions at the macro level, examining heavy metal as a cultural force that grew out of and into something that goes beyond the sound Commencing with Black Sabbath, Christie deftly traces metal s roots, utilising a formidable knowledge of important musicians, albums, songs and sub genres The book has been criticised for a middle section that comprehensively discusses Metallica, however, this was no less interesting to me and was entirely relevant it cannot be denied that Metallica s global dominance represented a watershed moment for heavy metal for better or worse, depending on who you talk to and the band succeeded not only as pioneers of thrash but also with critics and legions of fans In particular, Metallica is often cited as being the bridge that brings fans to metal when they had never listened to it before Christie s broad history is punctuated with interviews, photos, lists of must have records and most importantly, the passion of an author who is obviously a die hard heavy metal fan.
I actually give this work two and a half stars For me, it was a notch above ok The reason for my rating is as follows The book suffers from several major flaws.
1 It sometimes reads like the Book of Numbers from the Bible try reading the Book of Numbers and you ll see what I mean Too much detail in too little space with too many names of people and bands.
2 It lacks organization Ian Christe attempts to take on way too much in too few pages The outcome ends up being something like painting a house by splattering the paint everywhere.
3 The book never sites any sources, even though it s quite obvious Christe is quoting an interview, or extras that would be included on a DVD or a documentary, etc He needs to cite his sources Not doing so is just shoddy unprofessional writing.
4 He voices his opinion way too often and makes what he probably would consider factual statements about bands that are clearly false Once again, this is due to lack of citing sources, and poor research.
Now, on the the things I enjoyed about the book The subject matter is very interesting to me, so I enjoyed reading about metal bands I loved the illustrations and photographs in the book I liked the flow charts that were provided along with the tid bits usually one pagers about various genres of metal Christe included small bullet point timelines that were somewhat helpful And lastly, I liked that fact that I read the updated version which included metal in the Muslim world That was an interesting section.
Over all, I enjoyed the book, but didn t love it.
do you like heavy metal good for you do you love it then read this book it breaks down every aspect and genre of metal in fascinating and fact backed detail there are charts my only criticism with this book is that it starts the history of heavy metal right at the birth of black sabbath and while i agree that sabbath is the great grandaddy of all us bangers and rightly deserve our worship i gotta point out that the zep and deep purple had a hand in it, too and way waaaay waaaaaaaaaaaay before them was robert johnson, a blues musician from the early 20th c who was rud to have sold his soul to the devil and whose haunting blues tracks, such as me and the devil blues, were re issued in the 60s inspiring blues rockers of the time like the zep, who took their seed from black american music before doing their own white british genetic modification.
is there ever a perfect history book, though i doubt it this goes great hand in hand with lords of chaos and bang your head The Sound of the Beast will seriously school you on the world of metal Offering a very clear progression of metal as we know it from Black Sabbath to Dillinger Escape Plan, this book reads like a long version of the type of magazine article that makes you stay seated in the bathroom until you finish, reading The writing is entertaining without degenerating into mind numbing aural description and Christe rarely uses the same hyphenated adjective twice Taken as an exhaustive overview of all things metal, or a trip down memory lane, this book is a winner Two devil horns way up m A great read for anyone with a passion for the music or who s chewed through the numerous rock star autobiographies on the market Motley Crue s The Dirt, for example, is a compelling story about one band s experience of what it was to ride the wave of metal stardom in the 1980s While both books are focused on heavy metal, Ian Christie s functions at the macro level, examining heavy metal as a cultural force that grew out of and into something that goes beyond the sound Commencing with Black Sabbath, Christie deftly traces metal s roots, utilising a formidable knowledge of important musicians, albums, songs and sub genres The book has been criticised for a middle section that comprehensively discusses Metallica, however, this was no less interesting to me and was entirely relevant it cannot be denied that Metallica s global dominance represented a watershed moment for heavy metal for better or worse, depending on who you talk to and the band succeeded not only as pioneers of thrash but also with critics and legions of fans In particular, Metallica is often cited as being the bridge that brings fans to metal when they had never listened to it before Christie s broad history is punctuated with interviews, photos, lists of must have records and most importantly, the passion of an author who is obviously a die hard heavy metal fan.
I actually give this work two and a half stars For me, it was a notch above ok The reason for my rating is as follows The book suffers from several major flaws.
1 It sometimes reads like the Book of Numbers from the Bible try reading the Book of Numbers and you ll see what I mean Too much detail in too little space with too many names of people and bands.
2 It lacks organization Ian Christe attempts to take on way too much in too few pages The outcome ends up being something like painting a house by splattering the paint everywhere.
3 The book never sites any sources, even though it s quite obvious Christe is quoting an interview, or extras that would be included on a DVD or a documentary, etc He needs to cite his sources Not doing so is just shoddy unprofessional writing.
4 He voices his opinion way too often and makes what he probably would consider factual statements about bands that are clearly false Once again, this is due to lack of citing sources, and poor research.
Now, on the the things I enjoyed about the book The subject matter is very interesting to me, so I enjoyed reading about metal bands I loved the illustrations and photographs in the book I liked the flow charts that were provided along with the tid bits usually one pagers about various genres of metal Christe included small bullet point timelines that were somewhat helpful And lastly, I liked that fact that I read the updated version which included metal in the Muslim world That was an interesting section.
Over all, I enjoyed the book, but didn t love it.
Metal has been growing for a couple decades now and how built up quite a following of dedicated metalheads and crazy headbangers Many will tell you that it all started with Black Sabbath who is often considered to be the first ever heavy metal band The genre eventually evolved from the Sab Four to a variety of subgenres, making metal one of the most diverse genres of music and this book covers most of it all From the Bay Area thrash metal scene to the church burning Norwegian black metallers to Florida s relentless death metal act, the book explores many various aspects of what has become an extremely broad genre today The book gives many page explanations about various genres and various scenes with genre boxes that explain the sub genre and give several album recommendations It offers plenty of facts that may be a surprise to even the most dedicated metalheads.
Did you know that Lars Ulrich used to bash Slayer in their early days Did you know that Possessed were only 16 when the released their first album Did you know that Public Enemy sampled a Slayer song in She Watch Channel Zero Did you know Ice T was in a thrash metal band called Body Count Did you know Metallica s The Unforgiven II and probably I is named after the Clint Eastwood film Did you know that during concerts, Manowar used to call up any fans wearing Metallica shirts up onto stage, take the shirt and replace it with a Manowar shirt While this book certainly has a lot of information to keep any headbanger pleased, there are some nitpicks I have to mention Yup, you guessed it The author is way too obsessed with Metallica When I was going through the other user s reviews, I noticed that many of them said the same thing While reading the book, I soon realized they were right The thrash metal chapter alone has plenty of Metallica devotion However, this book probably documents every album of them, including an entire chapter dedicated to the Black Album Hell, take a look in the index and find out how much Metallica is mentioned compared to every other band.
Another complaint I had was about the genre boxes Certainly, they had a lot of recommendations that are probably worth checking into, but I seriously have to question if some of them belong into the correct genres For example, Slayer and Morbid Angel are considered black metal Further, gothic metal, folk metal, progressive metal or groove metal Why aren t there genre boxes for these At times, the book seems to throw a lot of names and quotes at once This may throw the reader off at some points because it sometimes doesn t distinguish exactly what genre the band is in For example, I believe Overkill was mentioned somewhere in the black metal section However, I suppose you really can t blame the author considering that there are so many metal bands to keep track of.
I also had a hard time not detecting bias in some of the chapters, and I m not just talking about Metallica For example, take this passage about glam metal If image was a crucial selling point, the ultimate sellout was the power ballad usually a maudlin, pseudo acoustic love some complete with a weepy guitar solo and lovelorn sing along chorus Or consider the fact that pop fans didn t mind being told what to think As a fan of both pop and metal, I beg to differ, even if modern pop is sometimes trashy.
Through its nearly 400 pages, Sound of the Beast offers a LOT of detail It also mentions magazines, many important musicians, record companies, MTV and tons While it certainly goes into moderate detail about the big names cough Metallica cough , it has a surprising amount of detail on Stryper, Saxon, Ratt and a few other names Luckily, Celtic Frost isn t overlooked either Some names, like In Flames, Hammerfall, Blind Guardian and Coroner are only mentioned once Dark Tranquillity, Annihilator and Amon Amarth are nowhere to be seen Overall, it s quite easy to see how passionate Ian Christe is about the metal genre, and any would be metalhead should pick this up in order to learn about the deep history unless they re a Metallica hater That way you ll know what is metal and what is not metal, like this There is nothing new that I read in this book All the ideas are generic, clich , biased, and Christe offered absolutely nothing to ponder Also, if I have to read the words Black and Sabbath one time arghghghalsdkf.
The Definitive History Of The First Years Of Heavy Metal, Containing Over Interviews With Members Of Black Sabbath, Metallica, Judas Priest, Twisted Sister, Slipknot, Kiss, Megadeth, Public Enemy, Napalm Death, AndMore Than Years After Black Sabbath Released The First Complete Heavy Metal Album, Its Founder, Ozzy Osbourne, Is The Star Of The Osbournes, TV S Favourite New Reality Show Contrary To Popular Belief, Headbangers And The Music They Love Are Alive Than Ever Yet There Has Never Been A Comprehensive Book On The History Of Heavy Metal Until Now Featuring Interviews With Members Of The Biggest Bands In The Genre, Sound Of The Beast Gives An Overview Of The Past Plus Years Of Heavy Metal, Delving Into The Personalities Of Those Who Created It Everything Is Here, From The Bootlegging Beginnings Of Fans Like Lars Ulrich Future Founder Of Metallica To The Sold Out Stadiums And Personal Excesses Of The Biggest Groups From Heavy Metal S Roots In The Work Of Breakthrough Groups Such As Black Sabbath And Led Zeppelin To MTV Hair Metal, Courtroom Controversies, Black Metal Murderers And Ozzfest, Sound Of The Beast Offers The Final Word On This Elusive, Extreme, And Far Reaching Form Of Music For my second time through this book, my feelings are pretty much the same as before It feels like a series of long magazine articles, as the casual and exuberant writing style seems to reflect that than the feel of a tightly written book One the downside, the coverage of Metallica is still extensive, but didn t bother me as much as the first time around, I guess because I ve somewhat come to terms with the reality tat they were are a band that played an important role in the history of the heavy metals But the second to last chapter, Virtual Ozzy and Metal s Digital Rebound , is hard to wade through as I have no interest in hearing about techno metal, rap metal or any of that stuff Kid Rock does not belong in a book about heavy metal, no matter how you twist is around I d like to say that Slipknot doesn t either, but here they are too.
But it is still a fun read, not too in depth or bogged down by details except for all of the Metallica coverage Sound of the Beast is a great and fun to read history of Heavy Metal, from Black Sabbath through NWOBHM, thrash, glam and death metal to the gross nu metal hybrids of modern times Though its coverage of black metal is a bit lacking, it seems to be just considered a branch of death metal here.
This is an excellent and much needed scholarly effort that skillfully weaves a comprehensive history of the vastly erratic, eclectic, and woefully underappreciated genre of Heavy Metal There is a LOT to the story than Metallica and 80 s Glam Rock despite what VH 1 tells you Sound of the Beast is a useful resource for anyone interested in going beyond the shallow depths of the industry spiel.
After being a metal fan for my entire life, I thought that I knew everything that I needed to know about the most misunderstood music genre Then I read this, an amazingly in depth of the whole genre from thrash, to glam to black metal, this is a witty and brilliantly written that took some serious time to digest.


There is nothing new that I read in this book All the ideas are generic, clich , biased, and Christe offered absolutely nothing to ponder Also, if I have to read the words Black and Sabbath one time arghghghalsdkf.
Metal has been growing for a couple decades now and how built up quite a following of dedicated metalheads and crazy headbangers Many will tell you that it all started with Black Sabbath who is often considered to be the first ever heavy metal band The genre eventually evolved from the Sab Four to a variety of subgenres, making metal one of the most diverse genres of music and this book covers most of it all From the Bay Area thrash metal scene to the church burning Norwegian black metallers to Florida s relentless death metal act, the book explores many various aspects of what has become an extremely broad genre today The book gives many page explanations about various genres and various scenes with genre boxes that explain the sub genre and give several album recommendations It offers plenty of facts that may be a surprise to even the most dedicated metalheads.
Did you know that Lars Ulrich used to bash Slayer in their early days Did you know that Possessed were only 16 when the released their first album Did you know that Public Enemy sampled a Slayer song in She Watch Channel Zero Did you know Ice T was in a thrash metal band called Body Count Did you know Metallica s The Unforgiven II and probably I is named after the Clint Eastwood film Did you know that during concerts, Manowar used to call up any fans wearing Metallica shirts up onto stage, take the shirt and replace it with a Manowar shirt While this book certainly has a lot of information to keep any headbanger pleased, there are some nitpicks I have to mention Yup, you guessed it The author is way too obsessed with Metallica When I was going through the other user s reviews, I noticed that many of them said the same thing While reading the book, I soon realized they were right The thrash metal chapter alone has plenty of Metallica devotion However, this book probably documents every album of them, including an entire chapter dedicated to the Black Album Hell, take a look in the index and find out how much Metallica is mentioned compared to every other band.
Another complaint I had was about the genre boxes Certainly, they had a lot of recommendations that are probably worth checking into, but I seriously have to question if some of them belong into the correct genres For example, Slayer and Morbid Angel are considered black metal Further, gothic metal, folk metal, progressive metal or groove metal Why aren t there genre boxes for these At times, the book seems to throw a lot of names and quotes at once This may throw the reader off at some points because it sometimes doesn t distinguish exactly what genre the band is in For example, I believe Overkill was mentioned somewhere in the black metal section However, I suppose you really can t blame the author considering that there are so many metal bands to keep track of.
I also had a hard time not detecting bias in some of the chapters, and I m not just talking about Metallica For example, take this passage about glam metal If image was a crucial selling point, the ultimate sellout was the power ballad usually a maudlin, pseudo acoustic love some complete with a weepy guitar solo and lovelorn sing along chorus Or consider the fact that pop fans didn t mind being told what to think As a fan of both pop and metal, I beg to differ, even if modern pop is sometimes trashy.
Through its nearly 400 pages, Sound of the Beast offers a LOT of detail It also mentions magazines, many important musicians, record companies, MTV and tons While it certainly goes into moderate detail about the big names cough Metallica cough , it has a surprising amount of detail on Stryper, Saxon, Ratt and a few other names Luckily, Celtic Frost isn t overlooked either Some names, like In Flames, Hammerfall, Blind Guardian and Coroner are only mentioned once Dark Tranquillity, Annihilator and Amon Amarth are nowhere to be seen Overall, it s quite easy to see how passionate Ian Christe is about the metal genre, and any would be metalhead should pick this up in order to learn about the deep history unless they re a Metallica hater That way you ll know what is metal and what is not metal, like this For my second time through this book, my feelings are pretty much the same as before It feels like a series of long magazine articles, as the casual and exuberant writing style seems to reflect that than the feel of a tightly written book One the downside, the coverage of Metallica is still extensive, but didn t bother me as much as the first time around, I guess because I ve somewhat come to terms with the reality tat they were are a band that played an important role in the history of the heavy metals But the second to last chapter, Virtual Ozzy and Metal s Digital Rebound , is hard to wade through as I have no interest in hearing about techno metal, rap metal or any of that stuff Kid Rock does not belong in a book about heavy metal, no matter how you twist is around I d like to say that Slipknot doesn t either, but here they are too.
But it is still a fun read, not too in depth or bogged down by details except for all of the Metallica coverage Sound of the Beast is a great and fun to read history of Heavy Metal, from Black Sabbath through NWOBHM, thrash, glam and death metal to the gross nu metal hybrids of modern times Though its coverage of black metal is a bit lacking, it seems to be just considered a branch of death metal here.
This is an excellent and much needed scholarly effort that skillfully weaves a comprehensive history of the vastly erratic, eclectic, and woefully underappreciated genre of Heavy Metal There is a LOT to the story than Metallica and 80 s Glam Rock despite what VH 1 tells you Sound of the Beast is a useful resource for anyone interested in going beyond the shallow depths of the industry spiel.
After being a metal fan for my entire life, I thought that I knew everything that I needed to know about the most misunderstood music genre Then I read this, an amazingly in depth of the whole genre from thrash, to glam to black metal, this is a witty and brilliantly written that took some serious time to digest.